Michael J. Fox Receives Standing Ovation During 2024 BAFTAs Appearance

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What Michael J. Fox Wants in the Next 30 Years

Welcome to the 2024 BAFTAs, Michael J. Fox.

The actor, 62, received a standing ovation during his appearance at the Royal Festival Hall in London on Feb. 18.

Fox—who lives with Parkinson’s disease—entered the stage in his wheelchair and then stood to present the final award of the evening in the Best Film category. And after hearing the applause, he thanked the audience for the greeting.

The prize went to Oppenheimer, making it one of the seven trophies Christopher Nolan‘s film took home that evening. The movie was up against Anatomy of a Fall, The Holdovers, Killers of the Flower Moon and Poor Things, and Fox spoke about the one thing they all had in common.

“They’re the best of what we do,” the Back to the Future star said at the podium. “No matter who you are or where you’re from, these films can bring us together. There’s a reason why they say movies are magic. Because a movie can change your day. It can change your outlook. It can sometimes even change your life.”

And he certainly knows about good movies. Before Fox presented the award, BAFTAs host David Tennant called him “a true legend of cinema.”

Kate Green/BAFTA/Getty Images for BAFTA

Fox—who also appeared on the red carpet with his wife Tracy Pollan earlier in the evening—was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 1991. Over the years, the Family Ties alum has raised billions of dollars for research programs through his Michael J. Fox Foundation. He’s also spoken candidly about his experience, including in his 2023 documentary Still and in interviews.

“The positivity is really sincere, and I really feel it. And it’s genuine,” he said in a November interview with CBS Mornings when asked if he ever battles with depression or uncertainty. “But it’s hard fought—and it’s hard won, I should say.”

“We can find ways to just give ourselves a break, give ourselves credit for getting through life on life’s terms,” Fox continued. “And in order to do that, you have to stop and say, ‘It’s not that bad. It’s not that bad.'”

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