Los Angeles Skyscraper Development Covered in Graffiti and Changes the Landscape

Must read

Breaking Out Even With Stellar Skincare? Your Towel Might Be the Issue

We independently selected these products because we love them, and we think you might like them at these prices. E! has affiliate relationships, so...

Taking Those “Tanning Pills” All Over TikTok Could, Indeed, Change Your Skin Tone

For instance, lycopene has a natural red pigment, which gives your favorite red fruits and vegetables, like beets and watermelon, their hue. The beta-carotene...

Interview: Selling Sunset’s Christine Quinn Is Committed to a Look That Is “Always Some Version of Barbie”

CQ: Um, I would say currently, no, but, a few years ago, yes, absolutely. I mean, I was 29 years old when season one...

Jamie Murray’s “Folly” Explores Incarceration and Redemption

All Images © Jamie Murray The photographs in Folly, the...

It seems insane we are still having this conversation, over 50 years since graffiti art as we know it now began showing up on city streets across America and then the rest of the world. But there is always a tough conversation that civic leaders and residents have about graffiti. But this one instance seems to have created a tipping point. And many people like it. 

Recently, the Oceanwide Plaza development in downtown LA was covered, floor to floor, by a bold collective graffiti artist takeover. What we can see is that because of another univerally unwanted residential eyesore skyscraper taking over our cities, two huge towers have taken up space in the city, unused, since 2019, artists are taking the space and making it their own. It’s quite a stunning feat, not unlike what we saw in Miami at the end of 2023, but graffiti artists (and artists in general who will start to make use of these empty urban centers) have found a new outlet and collective energy to remind city leaders that these empty, corporate-driven, residential towers that get developed with little care for the city or its residents, are going to start becoming the canvas of these major interventions. And we are here for it. 


LA Times columnist Gustavo Arellano wrote this weekend, “I’m no fan of graffiti, but I couldn’t help but admire what the taggers had accomplished. Before us was a monument to the Los Angeles of the moment, highlighting so many issues, consciously or not. Rampant overdevelopment downtown. Civic corruption. Out-of-control graffiti.” I don’t agree with the latter sentiment, but I do understand perhaps a lack of overall knowledge of the aesthetic, the artists behind these tags and the overall beauty of rebelling against the system. “Out of control graffiti” is always the lazy take, but there is sort of a charm in graffiti still being seen as taboo. But the writer does nail the former in his talk about what is wrong with these developments.. And graffiti artists are the ones who are highlighting these citywide issues. They are taking the streets, and the city’s voice, back. —Evan Pricco

The photo thumbnail is from NY Times. 

More articles

Latest article

13 Best Setting Sprays of 2023 to Lock Your Makeup in Place: MAC, Urban Decay, Benefit Cosmetics

Whether you're going full glam for a happy hour with friends or an important meeting, it's important to make sure that makeup look doesn't...

Don’t Mind Me, Just Admiring Gigi Hadid’s Supernaturally Good Hair Day — See the Photos

Gigi Hadid always has great hair, but there must have been something in the shampoo bowl water for her latest look, because it's beyond.Hadid...

15 Best Sephora Cyber Monday Sales 2022 to Restock Your Beauty Routine: Pat McGrath Labs, Sunday Riley, Tarte

Your lip collection isn't complete without the Urban Decay Vice Lipstick. Each of this lipstick's 35 shades is spiked with avocado oil and aloe...

Love Is Blind’s SK Alagbada Denies Cheating On Raven Ross

Love Is Blind's Raven and SK SPLIT Amid Cheating RumorsSikiru "SK" Alagbada is telling his side of the story.  The Love Is Blind star is...